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The term Marketeer is used to describe individuals, typically persons or groups of persons dressed in Red Fluffy jackets and having a Chuffin‘ Good Time!! Often engaged in drinking activities that involve all kinds of fun!!

 
     
 
Marketeers Carnival Club Bridgwater EST 1960
Never give in, never give in, never, never, never, never, in nothing, great or small, large or petty – never give in.
 

21st Year

1960-1980
21 years

To mark our 21st year a book was produce to celebrate and look back on the History of the club to that date.
THE HISTORY OF MARKETEERS CARNIVAL CLUB 1960 - 1980
WAS WRITTEN AND COMPILED BY DAVE STONE
With grateful thanks to Bob Chidgey, Lyn Gore, Andy Bawden, John Williams, Malcolm Wills, Chris Hocking and Gerrard Dunster
Without whom this book would not have been possible
This book as now been transferred to the PC by David Kirk Jnr (Jones) and used on this site.
We have split the book up into years; the stuff that did not fit into a year is below and will give you a good Snap shot of the club in 1981.


OUR GREAT SOCIAL CUSTOMS
It would be fair to say that, however far one delved back into the history of the Club, a very special comradeship has built up, with members old and new. Just to be able to talk to a person who had been a member of the Club or possibly just associated with it in years gone by makes one realise that many things have passed under the bridge, which we had never dreamt about. Back in the very early years, Carnival was not such a full time occupation and so socializing was strictly limited to a few dances at the Sydenham Community Center, which was then sited where the Withy Cutter now stands. As time went by, Carnival became a far more demanding pastime and so the need for a more organised social life arose. Among the first venues to be used was the Bridgwater Boys Club at All Saints Terrace. There, on a Saturday night, the Club would invite you to a "Mad Hatters Ball" where you could win a small prize for the most ingenious hat at the Ball. Similar functions were run at this venue, with one in particular coming to mind, this being an invitation to "The Mask-erade". In those days, the Club did not miss a trick to raise a few bob! For if you arrived at the door without a mask, first you paid your admission fee, then, would you believe it, you could purchase a mask, which was the only means of entry to the dance. Barbeques were also a popular social occasion with two very successful evenings being held at the Boys Club, and one at the Sea Cadets headquarters situated near the Docks. One remembers the Club negotiating a deal with a local farmer for one of his sows that had broken her leg. Well, if the price was right, we weren't fussy! Then came the move to the Market House, where we were to take advantage of a large social room upstairs. To this day, it is still our Clubroom where regular Monday evening meetings are held throughout the year. Over the years the social life has escalated to include such things as Treasure Hunts, where the members and wives, drive around remote country lanes looking for clues that will lead them to a quiet country Inn. The end result being a couple of pints, a pleasant buffet and perhaps a quiet chat about the Carnival idea. Other social events organised by the Club have included visits to the Cadbury Club, a night at the Beer Keller in Bristol and a trip to the Ice Rink for a spot of skating. The lads eagerly accept any challenge that may come their way, from a rugby match to cricket, or skittles, it does not matter which, as long as the main aim of the function is involved around Carnival. Some four years ago a comic football match was arranged at the Wellworthy Sports and Social Centre. It involved the Club's football team against a select sixteen from the remainder of the Club. It was felt that sixteen opponents against eleven was fair, bearing in mind that none of these played regular football. The rules were simple. Firstly, the larger side was allowed two goalkeepers, plus the fact that the offside rule did not apply. The opponent's goalie had to have one arm tied behind his back and finally; one side was to be dressed in nighties while the other team played in pyjamas. Even with odds of that nature stacked against them, the team of eleven players still managed to win by six goals to four. That afternoon was a wonderful opportunity for the wives and children to join in the fun from the touchline. Their involvement is vitally important to the success of the Club, because without their support, being a member of a Carnival Club would be an impossibility. Our Vice-Presidents take an active interest in the social side of the Club as well as the business side. They have now formed a "Vice-Presidents Association" with separate monthly meetings being held at the Halfway Inn. The sole reason for these meetings is to assist the Club in any way they can from cart building to fund raising. A regular monthly newsheet is now printed by the Vice-Presidents as a record of their previous month's meeting. On the last night of the Concerts, they play hosts to the Club members and helpers by supplying a first-class buffet together with music for the evening. Another aspect of the Club's social life is the "get togethers" after the various processions in the County Carnivals. A room is booked at one of the nearby pubs for food, drink and a singsong. Throughout the year, Club members pay into a football pontoon. The profits of which go towards the "Pontoon Dinner" which are a dinner dance held as near to Christmas as possible. Not to be outdone, the children of the Club members are given a party at the Valiant Soldier every Christmas Eve. There they are treated to a tea and then entertained by a novelty act. Finally, Father Christmas appears to make sure that they all get a present. Cabarets have been an important part of the Club's social and financial existence- for the past five years. Run at approximately ten-week intervals, it is important that every member plays his part in the success of the two evenings, as a minimum of forty people are required to make the shows run smoothly. Regular support for the Cabarets come from as far away as Swindon, Bristol, Exeter and Sidmouth. Over the past four years, audiences have been entertained by such stars as Ken Dodd, Faith Brown, Frank Carson, Paul Melba and many, many more. The culmination of the Carnival year is the Annual Social, when the Club recognises and thanks all the people who have given their time and help to make the Club run so smoothly.

Taken from the book
THE HISTORY OF MARKETEERS CARNIVAL CLUB 1960 - 1980 WRITTEN AND COMPILED BY DAVE STONE
With grateful thanks to Bob Chidgey, Lyn Gore, Andy Bawden, John Williams, Malcolm Wills, Chris Hocking and Gerrard Dunster
Without whom this book would not have been possible
Transferred to the web By David Kirk Jnr (Jones)

 

2009

2009

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2009

2009

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2009

2009

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